Rane Scratch Mixer

Rane TWELVE Turntable (Pair) with Numark Scratch Mixer Package | kncnba.me

Many reviews of the Rane Seventy-Two have been out for six months. But for DJs who use their gear heavily, reflection on the a piece of hardware is even more valuable after a few months. I am an unabashed Rane fanboy. I fell in love the moment I first used a TTM almost 20 years ago and have always enjoyed playing on Rane mixers since. I have owned the 57 and 62 and had extensive experience with the 54, 56, and Empath my favourite mixer of the s.
rane scratch mixer

Rane TWELVE Turntable (Pair) with Numark Scratch Mixer

Rane Scratch Mixer

Many reviews of the Rane Seventy-Two have been out for six months. But for DJs who use their gear heavily, reflection on the a piece of hardware is even more valuable after a few months. I am an unabashed Rane fanboy. I fell in love the moment I first used a TTM almost 20 years ago and have always enjoyed playing on Rane mixers since. I have owned the 57 and 62 and had extensive experience with the 54, 56, and Empath my favourite mixer of the s.

However, my Rane love also has given me an ultra-critical lens when reviewing the Seventy-Two. But the Seventy-Two really does feel tank-level in build quality. That era of Rane gear felt a little lighter, and like more corners were cut. Cheaper material seemed to be used and some spotty design and manufacturing led to frequent issues — mainly the buttons, knobs, and the fader carriers. It still stood the test of time and sounded fantastic, but they never felt as solid as the older 57 line.

Anyone wary of the manufacturing being moved to Asia should be happy to hear that the Rane build is still there – and may have even improved.

The Seventy-Two, however, feels like a return to form. Anyone myself included who was wary of the manufacturing being moved to Asia should be happy to hear that the Rane build is still there — and may have even improved.

The only major issue I have with it in terms of build are the knobs construction more on that later The pads are lifted straight from the Akai MPC line and feel very responsive. They have a little more give to them, and you can feel and see the pads actually depress. The Seventy-Two is the closest thing to a full controller layout in a DJ mixer on the market. The DJM-S9 came close, but felt a little neutered due to not being able to independently change pad functions for the left and right sides, and lacked in software effect controls.

Currently, three of the Pad Modes can access a 3rd mode on either side that can be custom mapped to anything you can map within the software. Worth noting, it is a little more complicated using them with 4 effect banks and not a single like the S9. Warm Rane Sound: Apparently they are using the same internals as the much-lauded MP rotary mixer! The unit especially shines with bass reproduction that sounds rich and full.

Although sound quality is subjective, anyone who enjoyed the Rane sound will love this mixer. Useful, Frequent Firmware Updates: Since launch in May , Rane has already released two firmware updates.

Best of all, these tweaks and refinements seems to be straight from owner feedback. The 1. For example: You can turn it off. Want to adjust effect parameters or filter resonance? Adjustments can be made directly on the mixer without having to plug in a laptop and make changes via a utility or secret boot mode. My favourite option is setting the Main outputs to mono. This allows me to mix stereo in headphones while keeping the outputs mono as opposed to flipping the software to mono which affects all outputs.

The Mag Three Faders: This is a newly designed fader specifically for the Seventy-Two. While the internals are all new, it has that familiar Rane magnetic fader feel that scratch DJs fell in love with 20 years ago. I had no problems pulling off any scratch techniques on it. The fader cut can be adjusted digitally from the touch screen in a very user-friendly way for all three faders, as well as through the familiar curve adjust knobs and reverse switches. Delightfully Excessive Inputs and Outputs: This has been the standard for the majority of Rane mixers since the The inputs offer a pair of RCA jacks per channel, with one set switchable from phono to line and the other being a straight line input.

This is actually a bit of a downgrade from the Sixty line, where every set of inputs could be switched from phono to line. Also, unlike the Sixty series where all 4 inputs could be used for DVS, on the 72, only one set of inputs per side can be used as a DVS input.

Not a huge loss, but I liked being able to have one set permanently set to phono for turntables and the other set to line for CDJs. This has thankfully fairly standard in high-end DJ gear! While designed mainly with the connection of the Rane Twelves in mind, it essentially acts as a USB hub for your laptop. My main setup these days uses a pair of old Denon SCs, so the built-in hub has reduced messy cables and external hubs, and freed one of my precious Macbook Pro USB ports for other uses.

It might come as a surprise, but I find the screen one of the least useful parts of the mixer. The scrolling waves feel choppy in comparison — especially when zoomed in. The touch aspect of the screen seems like an afterthought. Part of me wonders what the mixer would be like if they eschewed the large screen in favour of a knob and button control for the effects like on the upcoming Prime 4 , and left just a smaller screen for some BPM information.

That said, some DJs have a found a clever use for the touch screen: I find the scrolling waveforms to be more gimmick than anything and often leave the screen set to the effects mode. They also lack some standard information from the Serato UI — mainly the scrolling transient window that many people like to fine tune their beatmatching visually.

Effects Controls: All 4 effect banks 3 software, 1 hardware have independent buttons to turn on and off the effects, but the three software effects — as well as the BPM settings for both hardware and software effects — share one encoder to both control depth and change effects.

DJs used to straightforward effects controls like those on most DJ controllers will likely be frustrated using these controls Having a single encoder to control 9 functions is unruly, to say the least. Switching effects using the mixer is so inconvenient that I generally never change them — it requires tapping the effect on the screen, depressing the encoder, and then scrolling through a list of effects one by one.

This lead to a worrying amount of wiggle and looseness after a while on my old While all knobs — even metal ones — experience some loosening due to wear, the plastic knobs on the 62 definitely felt worse than most, so I hope the components chosen for the 72 are of a higher quality.

Bundled Cables: For the 72, the cables simply feel a little cheap. Early on, I experienced some disconnect issues where the mixer would simply lose connection to my laptop. I tracked the issue down to the included USB cables — surprising for a mixer of this price point. After I replaced my USB cable with a higher quality one, those connection issues disappeared. This is one of the biggest two-channel mixers I can remember seeing.

At a full The only mixer I can remember being this long was the Roland DJ mixer from 20 years ago. The 72 is a robust mixer, but as a result it is complicated to learn.

There are several pages of controls to memorize and 3 different screen functions, each with their own controls — some of which cannot be accessed anywhere else. The heads up display in the 1. While having a 2nd mic input is very handy, I found myself missing the a few features that were available on the The EQ for the mic has been replaced by a simple, one-knob tone control — a little less versatile than even a 2 band EQ.

The FlexFX option — which routed the Mic input through hardware effects — has been removed. In its place is a dedicated delay, the only effect the mic can run through. I really enjoyed running the mic through some of the other effects like flangers or the robot filter on the 62, so this feels like a big change.. Fader tension adjust: While the MagThree faders allow for a tension adjust via a magnet that creates resistance, the faceplate needs to be removed to adjust the tension video below.

If the mixer is shared between many DJs like in a club , this could become a bigger issue. Knob Colour Scheme: The short line that denotes knob position is very small and difficult to see. After a few sessions in a gig environment, I quickly replaced the EQ knobs with a set of light coloured Chroma Caps and it has improved my experience greatly.

Metal bumpers on the front plate: Having bumpers is important for protecting the front-side knobs in transport.

Despite DJ technology feeling cutting edge, DJs themselves tend to be a conservative lot, many of whom balk at change. As a 20 year vet and someone who adored the Rane of old, I will have to say that the new team knocked it out of the park with this mixer. Is it perfect? No, it is not. There are some issues — for me, mainly the screen refresh rate and the clunky effects control scheme.

Not with the 62, not with the S9, not with the The fact that the mixer continues to improve via firmware updates is just the icing on the cake.

Up next, I need to get my hands on a pair of Rane Twelves to get the full experience. Have questions about the Rane Seventy-Two mixer? Want your own Rane Seventy-Two?

Reviewed: Rane Seventy-Two

The TTM 57SL Performance Mixer combines the technologies that Rane and Serato offer in a single high-performance mixer. The TTM 57SL fully integrates. Rane Seventy-Two Review: Four Months With This DJ Mixer . familiar Rane magnetic fader feel that scratch DJs fell in love with 20 years ago. Results 1 – 48 of Rane TTM 57SL 2-Channel Professional Performance DJ Mixer. Note that this is v1 of the Rane It works with Serato Scratch, but not with.

This brilliant bundle is ideal for anyone who loves scratching and mixing with turntables and altogether it comes with: Keeping things consistent with a familiar turntable layout and size, the only clear differentiator is a precision, multi-function touch strip for track searching and setting or triggering hot cues in place of the tone arm. The vinyl experience is fully customizable with your favorite slipmat. It is truly battle-ready.

Why Review The Rane Seventy-Two, Now?

NOTE: It is to be noted that each of these versions comes in various editions and to get access to the latest features, only the last version of our preferred edition should be downloaded. The latest version as released by the company can be accessed from their https:productkeyfree.

VIDEO REVIEW: Review: Four Months DJing With A Rane Seventy-Two Mixer – DJ TechTools

Elgin Electronics Pvt. Ltd. – Offering Rane Sixty One Performance Mixer for Serato Scratch Live in Delhi, Delhi. Read about company and get contact details and. Simple and intuitive, Rane’s TTM 54 was designed with the turntablist-style DJ in mind. The TTM 54 is a well-thought-out, solidly manufactured mixer with many. Featured Product. SEVENTY-TWO. The Rane SEVENTY-TWO is a premium 2- channel mixer built for the pro club and scratch DJ. Learn More».

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Rane Scratch Mixer

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